Best potluck ever and a taste tripping party to boot!

I knew I was in for some good eats when I was invited to a potluck dinner party at A Canadian Foodie‘s gorgeous house (a.k.a Valerie), and then I found out that over 30 foodies and bloggers were invited. And when I found out that part of the evening includes a chance to try the miracle berry, well let’s just say that there was nothing short of the plague that was going to keep me away.

I started off trying to take nice photos but then I eventually gave up and took half-hearted, slightly blurry ones instead. There were lots of other people with better photos though, so don’t worry I’m sure there will be more popping up on blogs soon! I’m linking to recipes and blogs as much as possible but there were so many people there that it’s inevitable that I will miss some.

Valerie and her husband Vanja are great hosts and they made me feel welcome as soon as I stepped into their home. I thought I was going to arrive a little bit late but people were just starting to arrive when I got there. Valerie was prepared – name tags for all of us as well as tags for all our dishes!

potluck signs

potluck signs

more potluck signs

more potluck signs

Look at the dish names; this wasn’t just any old potluck! When foodies bring food (even “simple dishes” like we were instructed), we go all out.

Moose tongue and homemade saskatoon wine

Moose tongue and homemade saskatoon wine

Two different cuts of smoked moose tongue and homemade saskatoon wine by the talented Kevin Kossowan. Tasted like a heavily smoked ham and was delish. I think I preferred the texture of the back section of the tongue more though (dish on the left).

kefta, prosciutto and fig crostini, and tzaziki

kefta, prosciutto and fig crostini, and tzaziki

Kefta from XOX Lea Lea, prosciutto and fig crostini, and tzaziki from Take it and Like it.

OMG so much food!

OMG so much food!

Then so many people started to arrive all at once and I gave up trying to take photos of everyone’s dishes. Just look at that bounty! My mouth waters just thinking about all the yummy dishes. Yes, someone brought a rice cooker. And someone else brought a tagine! I’m glad Valerie let me borrow one of her dishes to plate my dessert, cause I think my plastic Ziploc container wouldn’t have looked nearly as impressive. Continue reading

Advertisements

Momofuku cookbook – fresh oysters and pickled Asian pears

Gong hay fat choy! Happy Chinese New Year! And happy Valentine’s Day to you as well! I’ve got a special treat for you today as a present from me to you, with help from Valerie and Beavie over at A Canadian Foodie. When Valerie found out that I got a copy of the Momofuku cookbook by David Chang and Peter Meehan for Christmas, she had a great idea for us to pick out recipes and do them at the same time in order to compare our experiences.

Momofuku cookbook

Momofuku cookbook

A quick flip through the cookbook told me one thing – David Chang doesn’t do simple recipes. At first glance they may seem simple but this initial impression is deceptive as most of his main recipes comprise of 2+ recipes combined together. Some of them can take days.

I had first choice, and I wanted to start with something simple, so I picked fresh oysters with a pickled Asian pear and black pepper mignonette.

The book has a fairly detailed section on how to choose, clean and open fresh oysters (pages 131-133). I was already familiar with most of these rules, but I thought one rule was a great reminder for myself: smell the oyster before you serve it and see if it smells clean and fresh and sweet – of the sea but not fishy.

I chose some lovely (but small) Malpeque oysters from Prince Edward Island. I gave them a good scrub under cold water, and kept them in the fridge until I was ready to shuck them.

Freshly scrubbed oysters

Freshly scrubbed oysters

Continue reading